Visiting Faculty Fellows

Our Goal:

The Visiting Faculty Fellows program is intended to extend the practice of humanities research and education philosophically grounded at the undergraduate level into liberal arts colleges and Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Duke, as a research hub, can offer its research opportunities to faculty from these institutions and by extension have its impact on their undergraduates even as we can learn from the knowledge and world-views generated at these other institutions. This element of the HWL grant realizes the Mellon Foundation’s desire to reframe humanities as an engine for new knowledge production and to multiply the benefits of the Humanities Writ Large initiative at Duke.

2015-16 Visiting Faculty Fellows

The Humanities Writ Large Steering Committee has selected four Visiting Faculty Fellows for the 2015-16 academic year.  They are:

Professor Cherem will be working with Professor Allen Buchanan in the Philosophy Department and with Professor Suzanne Shanahan in the Kenan Institute for Ethics.  Professor Cherem's work focuses on the ethical challenges created by "externalized" state border controls: policies that try to prevent migrant arrival by projecting or outsourcing a nation's authority over migration beyond its regular territorial borders. While at Duke he will work on two research projects about the due process standards appropriate for refugee status adjudications and the ethical issues raised by partnerships that delegate or coordinate authority.  He also plans on volunteering with the refugee community in Durham area so as to learn about resettlement from their perspective.

Professor Fofana's work at Duke will include examining the role of mobile cinema (Cinema Numerique Ambulant or CNA)­ in social change. Through funding from NGO's CNA occupies the awkward position of "promoting" Western hegemonies while concurrently endeavoring to bring messages of self-determination to the village audiences in francophone West Africa.  He will work with Cultural Anthropology Professor Charlie Piot, with Romance Studies / History Professor Laurent Dubois, and with members of the Center for French and Francophone Studies. In addition, he is planning to develop a web-based resource for an undergraduate course on African Cinema that uses insights from history, geography, political science, anthropology, philosophy, literature, film, and the arts to provide students with essential intellectual building blocks for a more comprehensive understanding of the African continent.

Professor Goldsmith's project will synthesize her scholarly and pedagogical interests and draw upon resources at Duke including the Franklin Humanities Institute, the PhD Lab in Digital Knowledge, the Wired! Lab, and the Rubenstein Library.  Among her partners will be Associate Professor of History Philip Stern, Associate Curator of Collections Sara Seten Berghausen, PhD Lab Co-Director and Professor of Romance Studies David Bell, and Associate Research Professor in Visual and Media Studies Victoria Szabo.  Professor Goldsmith plans to develop a mapping project focusing on Edith Wharton’s New York, to build on her work with Ursinus’s Council for Undergraduate Research team to develop scalable research projects for undergraduate humanities students throughout the curriculum, and to collaborate on developing pathways to sustain humanities undergraduate research as a distinctive feature of the Duke and Ursinus undergraduate curricula.

Professor McGuire will be working on a monograph, The British Musical Fesitval, 1695-1940: A Social History of Taste, that investigates the musical festival in Great Britain, which was one of the most important means of concert music production in Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries. Through such festivals, the middle classes ultimately became arbiters of musical taste.  In addition, he will continue the development of the Musical Festivals Database, a fully searchable index of programs, personnel, ensembles and venues of musical festivals held in the United Kingdom between 1695 and 1940. This will be important to musicologists, music theorists, and social historians in allowing one to see, for instance, the creation of the musical canon that we know today – but more importantly, it shows just how malleable that canon has always been.  His Duke sponsor, Associate Professor of Music Philip Rupprecht, will help him connect with Duke courses where he can interact with our undergraduate students and with other members of the Music department.

Max Gabriel Cherem

    • Cherem headshot

Amadou T. Fofana

    • Fofana headshot

Meredith Goldsmith

    • Goldsmith headshot

Charles Edward McGuire

    • McGuire headshot 150x150
  • blue background