Thomas Parker

Associate Professor of French and Francophone Studies

-- Vassar College
HWL Affiliation: Emerging Network, Visiting Faculty Fellow
Year Visiting: 
2013 to 2015

Thomas Parker spent the Spring 2014 semester at Duke, hosted by Professor Laurent Dubois in Romance Studies. During this time he developed a transdisciplinary teaching project that engaged Duke faculty and undergraduates in numerous disciplines with the topic of "subnature" (“Subnature” is a word coined by architectural historian David Gissen for aspects of nature that the architectural discipline has traditionally shunned, such as dankness, darkness, mud, weeds, smoke, puddles, dust, debris, crowds, and pigeons. Subnature encapsulates the “problems” architects have attempted to solve, circumvent and avoid in favor of qualities such as light, airiness, cleanliness, and flow.) as applied to food.

Parker returned to Duke in Fall 2014 to coordinate a series of events, Subnature and Culinary Culture, that allowed the Duke community to explore “goût du terroir” (“taste of place”), a term for the distinct flavors imprinted on a food or wine by its physical origin, as well as the social and cultural impacts of incorporating "subnatural" foods into mainstream dining. 

Projects

Emerging Networks, Visiting Faculty Fellow
2014-2015
Visiting Faculty Fellow
2017-2017

Highlights

Subnature Featured on the Gastropod Podcast
-- Nov 25 2014
Nicola Twilley, food blogger and contributing writer at the New Yorker, visited Duke to partake in the Subnature and Culinary Culture events this past September. She and journalist Cynthia Graber ... Read More
Subnature and Culinary Culture Kickoff Event
-- Sep 11 2014
The opening event for Subnature and Culinary Culture was on Wednesday, September 3 at the Franklin Center. It began with a lunch that featured seaweed salad and crunchy cricket salt and ended with... Read More
Terroir Tapestries: An Interactive Consumption Project
-- Jan 12 2017
An essay by Jennifer Jacqueline Stratton, a documentary artist and scholar and graduate of Duke’s MFAEDA program, and Ashley Rose Young, a doctoral student in Duke’s history department, was recently... Read More